Archive for the taiji Category

No thinking

Posted in practice, taiji, words and concepts on October 24, 2010 by marksun

In practicing taichi, thinking is a distraction from concentration and focus, the holding of one point.  In qigong, we are admonished – “no thinking! only to feel…”

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Repulse Monkey

Posted in taiji with tags on October 24, 2010 by marksun

Review of 2nd cross hand set and repulse monkey. The final position, hand forward pushing, opposite hand pulling should be reached in a definite way.  Only then does the next cycle begin –  rear hand drops,  the forward hand rotates upward  while the foot on the same side as the forward hand is planted a step back in the direction of retreat, weight shifts back,  and finally the forward foot lifts.

Eight Gates and Five Directions

Posted in taiji, words and concepts on October 18, 2010 by marksun

The Eight Gates and Five Directions

Some say that all Tai Chi is based on thirteen fundamental postures: eight gates and five directions.   The gates and  direction are within everyone, to be discovered and practiced.

From Thirteen Postures of Ta’i Chi ( from Michaed P. Garfalo’s site)

  1. Ward of – Peng
  2. Roll back – Lu
  3. Press – Ji
  4. Push – An
  5. Pull Down – Tsai
  6. Split – Lieh
  7. Elbow – Chou
  8. Shoulder – Kao
  9. Advancing Steps –  Jin
  10. Retreating Steps – Tui
  11. Stepping to the left Side – Ku
  12. Stepping to the right Side- Pan
  13. Settling at the Center – Ding

 

Slant Flying (21)

Posted in instruction, practice, taiji with tags , on October 17, 2010 by marksun

Slant Flying,  which comes after repulse monkey and before crane spreads its wings is a thrust  directed forward and not a chop delivered horizontally as is the case with the similar looking the Wild Horse’s Mane is Flying – 55, aka parting the mane.

fist under elbow and the connection of hands with feet

Posted in instruction, practice, taiji with tags on September 26, 2010 by marksun

The left hand in fist under elbow should have the thumb spread apart from the other four fingers (as if to catch a hand attacking the head).

In clouds hands the movement of the hands and the feet, a beginners error occurs when hands are disconnected from the waist.  Most can see the difference in the overall coordination of movement if the move is demonstrated.

Second Cross Hand

Posted in practice, taiji with tags , , , on September 19, 2010 by marksun

The second cross hands begin with a turn and peng ji li an.  An, the press movement, should not extend beyond the natural reach,  and there is relaxation of the arms and upper body. In the movement from an, the relaxation of the body causes the hands to be positioned down near the waist rather than high, and the blocking motions of the initial turn to the left then right preceeding fist-under-elbow are what raise the hands.  The left foot in the final fist-under-elbow posture positioned heel down should be such that nearly all the weight is on the right foot, allowing easy repositioning the left foot if necessary.

repulse monkey (20 step back and hit throat -three steps)notes

Posted in instruction, taiji, Uncategorized with tags , , on March 7, 2010 by marksun

from class 7mar10 –  Limin’s observations

Hand position : the position of the  hand striking out will be palm down, fingers together in-line with the forearm and positioned to strike  the throat of an opponent with the edge of the hand.  The hand on the bottom is positioned to grasp and  pull  palm up with final position near the solar plexus (middle of the chest , bottom of the sternum).  The hands work together.

Foot positioning – The front foot faces straight ahead.  The heel of the rear foot  is in line with the front foot with the toes 90 degrees from this line.  As one retreats (steps backward) ,   the front foot is placed behind what was formerly the back foot – and the back foot becomes the new front foot (that could said better I know).  The toes move as the body rotates to point directly forward.

as always – song,chen,shen  – the body must be relaxed, loose, no tension.

see #20 from YangStyle Taijiquan  psd from Limin.